5 Cognitive Benefits of Resistance Exercise

In recent years, science has begun to unravel the many benefits of resistance exercise. Once thought to be beneficial only for physical health, we now know that resistance exercise can also have positive effects on cognitive function. The following article explores five cognitive benefits of resistance exercise. From improved brain function to greater mental clarity, read on to learn more about how resistance exercise can benefit your mind as well as your body.

1. Improve Memory

Resistance Exercise Improve Memory
Photo by Ian Dooley

It’s no secret that as we age, our memory and cognitive abilities start to decline. However, research has shown that resistance exercise can help improve memory and cognitive function in older adults.

A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found that just 10 weeks of resistance exercise improved memory and cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Another study, published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, found that 12 weeks of resistance exercise improved executive function (which includes things like planning, decision making, and multitasking) in older adults.

So how does resistance exercise help improve memory and cognitive function? It’s thought that resistance exercise helps by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is a protein that helps support the growth, survival, and development of neurons. Studies have shown that BDNF levels are lower in people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. By increasing BDNF levels through resistance exercise, we may be able to help improve memory and cognitive function in older adults.

2. Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

It is no secret that exercise confers a multitude of benefits on our physical health, but did you know that it can also help improve cognitive function and protect against Alzheimer’s disease? A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease shows that just three months of resistance exercise can lead to improved brain health in older adults.

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative neurological disorder characterized by memory loss and cognitive decline. It is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5.7 million Americans. The disease is currently without a cure, and its prevalence is expected to triple by 2050. Given the gravity of the situation, any interventions that could help prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s are worth exploring.

The new study involved 60 sedentary adults between the ages of 55 and 86 who were divided into two groups. One group participated in thrice-weekly sessions of resistance exercise, while the other group did not engage in any exercise intervention. After 12 weeks, participants in the resistance exercise group showed significant improvements in brain structure and function when compared to those in the control group. These changes were observed even though there was no difference in fitness levels between the two groups at the start of the study.

While more research is needed to confirm these findings, they suggest that even short-term exposure to resistance exercise can have positive effects on brain health. So if you’re looking for ways to boost your cognitive function

3. Increase Brain Size

Resistance Exercise for Brain Size
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We all know that regular exercise is good for our physical health, but did you know that it can also benefit your cognitive health? A recent study has shown that resistance exercise can actually increase brain size.

The study, which was published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, looked at a group of older adults who underwent six months of resistance exercise . The researchers found that the participants who completed the exercise had increased brain volume in the areas of the brain responsible for executive function and memory.

This is great news for those of us looking to keep our minds sharp as we age. Resistance exercise is a form of exercise that can be easily incorporated into our daily routine, and it doesn’t require any special equipment or membership fees. So what are you waiting for? Start pumping some iron today!

4. Improve Executive Function

There is growing evidence that resistance exercise can improve executive function, which is the set of cognitive skills responsible for planning, flexibility, and self-control. A recent study found that just eight weeks of resistance exercise improved executive function in older adults.

Other research has shown that resistance exercise can improve brain function in people of all ages. For example, one study found that six months of resistance exercise improved memory and thinking skills in young adults. Another study found that 12 weeks of resistance exercise improvedmemory and executive function in middle-aged adults.

The benefits of resistance exercise on cognitive function may be due to the fact that it increases brain activity. Resistance exercise has also been shown to increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that promotes nerve cell growth and regeneration.

So if you’re looking for a way to boost your brain power, don’t forget to add some resistance exercise to your workout routine!

5. Reduce Depression and Anxiety

Resistance Exercise Reduce Depression
Photo by Ehimetalor Akhere

There are many benefits to resistance exercise , including reducing depression and anxiety. Depression and anxiety are common mental health disorders that can have a negative impact on your life. Resistance exercise can help to reduce the symptoms of these disorders and improve your overall mental health.

Depression is a mental health disorder characterized by persistent sadness and loss of interest in activities. It can interfere with your ability to work, sleep, eat, and enjoy activities you once enjoyed. Anxiety is a mental health disorder characterized by excessive worry and fear. It can make it difficult to concentrate, sleep, or relax.

Resistance exercise has been shown to be an effective treatment for depression and anxiety. A study published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research found that resistance exercise helped to reduce the symptoms of depression in adults. Another study published in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics found that resistance exercise was effective in reducing anxiety symptoms in adults.

Resistance exercise can help to improve your mood and reduce the symptoms of depression and anxiety. It is important to consult with a doctor or mental health professional before starting any exercise program.

How to Get Started With Resistance Exercise

If you’re looking to improve your cognitive function, one of the best things you can do is start resistance exercise.

There are many benefits of resistance exercise, including improved brain function. Studies have shown that people who engage in regular resistance exercise have cognitive function benefits than those who don’t.

So, how do you get started with resistance exercise? Here are some tips:

1. Find a good program: There are many different ways to Resistance train, so it’s important to find a program that fits your goals and lifestyle. For example, if you’re short on time, there are many quick workouts you can do at home with minimal equipment.

2. Start slow: Don’t try to do too much too soon. Start with a few basic exercises and gradually add more as you get stronger and more comfortable with the movements.

3. Focus on form: Proper form is essential for both safety and effectiveness. Make sure you understand how to perform each exercise correctly before adding weight or increasing the intensity.

4. Listen to your body: Pay attention to how your body feels during and after each workout. If something doesn’t feel right, stop and consult a professional before continuing.

Resistance exercise is an excellent way to improve cognitive function and overall health. By following these tips, you’ll be on your way to getting started with this beneficial type of exercise!

Conclusion

There are plenty of reasons to do resistance exercise , and cognitive benefits are among them. As we age, our brains can start to deteriorate, but resistance exercise has been shown to help improve brain function and prevent cognitive decline. If you’re looking for a workout that’s good for your body and your mind, resistance exercise is a great option. And with these five cognitive benefits, there’s even more reason to give it a try.

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